top of page
Psychologist Session.jpg-2.webp

ADHD

Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) affects a person's ability to pay attention, control impulsive behaviors, and regulate their activity level. Speak to a provider today.

What people get wrong about ADHD

Over the years, there have been several misunderstanding about Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). Here are a few of them:

  • ADHD is just a lack of discipline or motivation: While a lack of discipline or motivation can be a symptom of ADHD, it is not the root cause of the disorder. ADHD is a neurodevelopmental disorder that is caused by differences in brain development and function.

  • ADHD is only a childhood disorder: While ADHD is often diagnosed in childhood, it can also affect adults. In fact, about 4% of adults in the US have ADHD (National Institute of Mental Health, ADHD.

  • ADHD is just an excuse for bad behavior: While symptoms of ADHD can sometimes lead to challenging behaviors, it is important to remember that people with ADHD do not choose to have the disorder and may struggle to control their symptoms.

  • Medication is the only treatment for ADHD: While medication can be an effective treatment for ADHD, it is not the only option. Other treatments, such as therapy, education, and lifestyle changes, can also be effective in managing the symptoms of ADHD.

 

Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a neurodevelopmental disorder that affects a person's ability to pay attention, control impulsivity, and regulate activity levels. It is typically diagnosed in childhood, but can also be diagnosed in adults. There have been a number of recent findings about ADHD that have increased our understanding of the disorder and how it can be effectively treated.

One recent finding is that ADHD is not caused by a lack of discipline or bad parenting, as was previously thought. Instead, it is a complex disorder that is thought to be caused by a combination of genetic and environmental factors.

Another recent finding is that ADHD is not just a disorder that affects children. It is a lifelong disorder that can also be diagnosed in adults. Adults with ADHD may have difficulty with time management, organization, and decision-making, and may also experience problems with relationships and employment.

There have also been recent developments in the treatment of ADHD. In addition to traditional treatments such as medication and therapy, newer treatments such as mindfulness-based therapies and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) are being explored as potential options for people with ADHD.

Overall, the research on ADHD continues to evolve, and there is still much that we do not know about the disorder. However, advances in our understanding of ADHD and its treatment are helping to improve the lives of people with ADHD and their families.

Causes of ADHD

The exact cause of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is not fully understood,

but it is thought to be caused by a combination of genetic and environmental factors.

Genetic factors: There is a strong genetic component to ADHD, and it is common for people with ADHD to have a family member with the disorder. Research has identified several genes that are associated with an increased risk of developing ADHD, but it is likely that many more genes are involved.

Environmental factors: Certain environmental factors, such as premature birth, low birth weight, and exposure to tobacco smoke or alcohol during pregnancy, have been linked to an increased risk of developing ADHD. Other environmental factors, such as a traumatic brain injury or exposure to lead, have also been suggested as possible contributing factors.

Brain structure and function: Researchers have also found differences in certain brain structures and functions in people with ADHD. For example, some studies have shown that the brain's "reward system," which helps to regulate attention and motivation, is underactive in people with ADHD. Other studies have found differences in the size and functioning of certain areas of the brain, such as the prefrontal cortex and the basal ganglia, in people with ADHD.

Symptoms of ADHD

Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a neurodevelopmental disorder that affects a person's ability to pay attention, control impulsivity, and regulate activity levels. The symptoms of ADHD can vary from person to person, but may include:

  • Difficulty paying attention: People with ADHD may have trouble paying attention to tasks or activities, even when they are interested in them. They may also have difficulty following instructions or completing tasks, and may be easily distracted by irrelevant stimuli.

  • Impulsivity: People with ADHD may act impulsively without thinking about the consequences of their actions. This can lead to problems with social interactions, decision-making, and self-control.

  • Hyperactivity: Some people with ADHD may be excessively active and have difficulty sitting still or being quiet. They may fidget, squirm, or talk excessively.

It is important to note that these symptoms can vary in severity and may not be present all the time.

Symptoms of ADHD may also change over time, and may be more or less noticeable in different situations.

How to Manage ADHD

 

Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a complex disorder that can impact a person's daily life. However, there are effective strategies that can help manage the symptoms of ADHD and improve daily functioning. Some strategies that may be helpful in managing ADHD include:

  • Medication: Stimulant medications, such as amphetamines and methylphenidates, are commonly used to treat ADHD. These medications can help improve attention and reduce impulsivity and hyperactivity. It is important to work with a healthcare professional to determine the best medication and dosage for your specific needs.

  • Therapy: Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) and behavioral therapy are effective treatments for ADHD. These therapies can help individuals with ADHD learn coping strategies and better manage their symptoms.

  • Structured routine: A structured routine can help individuals with ADHD stay organized and on track. This may include setting regular bedtimes, establishing a consistent morning routine, and creating a schedule for homework, chores, and other activities.

  • Break tasks into smaller steps: Large tasks or projects can be overwhelming for individuals with ADHD. Breaking tasks into smaller steps and setting specific goals can help make them more manageable.

  • Get enough sleep: Sleep is important for everyone, but it is particularly important for individuals with ADHD. Lack of sleep can make ADHD symptoms worse, so it is important to establish good sleep habits and aim for 7-9 hours of sleep per night.

  • Exercise: Regular physical activity can help improve ADHD symptoms and overall well-being. Exercise can help reduce stress, improve focus, and boost self-esteem.

It's important to work with a mental health professional to determine the most effective treatment plan. A combination of therapy, medication, and lifestyle changes is often the most effective approach. It's also important to be patient and to understand that recovery from any illness can take time. Salvage Psychiatry is here for you. You can connect with a mental health provider by booking an appointment or calling (818) 337-9072.

bottom of page